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Blood and Bone Marrow Oncology Program

While typically blood and bone marrow cancers are relatively simple to diagnose, finding the right treatment center can be complex for patients. You need the guidance and expertise of experienced oncologists, a system of support while you get better and a facility where you can receive excellent care in a comfortable setting close to home.

At our Blood and Bone Marrow Oncology Program, you will find those caring and experienced oncologists, coupled with a state-of-the-art treatment center, including the region's largest infusion center. Our supportive care program is very popular with patients, who seek the guidance of nurse navigators, social workers, spiritual care and support groups.

Blood and Bone Marrow Cancer Treatments in Annapolis, MD

The oncologists who lead the Blood and Bone Marrow Oncology Program diagnose and treat blood and platelet disorders. These cancers are treated with non-surgical therapies, including chemotherapy. If you require a bone marrow transplant, we have partnerships with hospitals in Baltimore, M., where you will receive the care of your own doctors partnered with their physicians' expertise in bone marrow transplants.

Clinical Trials in Blood and Bone Marrow Cancers

Our physicians are involved in a wide variety of research opportunities and clinical trials, giving our patients access to cutting-edge technologies and treatment offerings. Patients have the option to participate in research conducted at AAMC and at other locations across the nation.

In addition, the Anne Arundel Health System Research Institute has been named the inaugural affiliate of the Johns Hopkins Clinical Research Network. The network's goal is to allow patients at regional health systems such as AAMC to benefit from their advances in areas such as diagnostic, treatment, and disease prevention. This affiliation gives our patients access to authoritative clinical research and an even wider range of options in patient care. Learn more about our research.

What are cancers of the blood and bone marrow?

Leukemia

Leukemia starts in blood-forming tissue such as the bone marrow and causes large numbers of blood cells to be produced and enter the bloodstream.

Hodgkin's Lymphoma

This cancer of the immune system is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The two major types of Hodgkin's lymphoma are classical Hodgkin lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma. Symptoms include the painless enlargement of lymph nodes, spleen, or other immune tissue. Other symptoms include fever, weight loss, fatigue, or night sweats. Also called Hodgkin's disease.

Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

This is a large group of cancers of lymphocytes (white blood cells). Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas can occur at any age and are often marked by lymph nodes that are larger than normal, fever, and weight loss. There are many different types of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. These types can be divided into aggressive (fast-growing) and indolent (slow-growing) types, and they can be formed from either B-cells or T-cells. B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas include Burkitt lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, immunoblastic large cell lymphoma, precursor B-lymphoblastic lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma. T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas include mycosis fungoides, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and precursor T-lymphoblastic lymphoma. Lymphomas that occur after bone marrow or stem cell transplantation are usually B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and type of disease. Also called NHL.

Multiple Myelomas

This type of cancer begins in plasma cells (white blood cells that produce antibodies). Also called Kahler disease, myelomatosis, and plasma cell myeloma.

Immunological disorders

These are certain cancer types that are more likely to occur in people who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The most common types are Kaposi sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Other AIDS-related cancers include Hodgkin's disease and cancers of the lung, mouth, cervix, and digestive system

Myelodysplastic Syndrome

This is a  group of slow growing blood cancers, including chronic myelogenous leukemia, in which large numbers of abnormal red blood cells, white blood cells, or platelets grow and spread in the bone marrow and the peripheral blood.

Myeloproliferative disorders

This is a group of slow growing blood cancers, including chronic myelogenous leukemia, in which large numbers of abnormal red blood cells, white blood cells, or platelets grow and spread in the bone marrow and the peripheral blood.

Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)

This is a cancer that starts in blood-forming tissue such as the bone marrow and causes large numbers of blood cells to be produced and enter the bloodstream.

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