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Medical Staff Office

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Name: Medical Staff Office Medical Staff Office
Date registered: April 8, 2013

Latest posts

  1. Zika Virus Update — June 23, 2016
  2. AAMC Hosts First-Ever Virtual Grand Rounds — June 23, 2016
  3. We’ve Got Your Back: Let the Collaborative Care Network Help You — June 23, 2016
  4. Outpatient Home Therapy — April 29, 2016
  5. Medical Staff In The News: March/April 2016 — April 29, 2016

Most commented posts

  1. Welcome, New AAMC Medical Staff — 4 comments
  2. Educating the Future of Medicine: AAMC Approved for Surgical GME — 2 comments
  3. Complex passwords now required — 2 comments
  4. Simulation and educational opportunities at the Earl SAIL Center — 2 comments
  5. Advancing our cardiac care — 2 comments

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Zika Virus Update

by Medical Staff Office on June 23, 2016

An update from Mary Clance, MD, hospital epidemiologist: It has now been six months since the epidemic of Zika virus in South America came to the attention of U.S. public health authorities. During that time, the transmission zone has expanded northward from Brazil and now includes more than 25 countries in the Caribbean, South and Central America and Mexico. Local transmission is dependent upon two mosquito species, Aedes aegypti and albopictus, which have been established in the U.S. following importation from overseas. Both are now present in Maryland.

As of June 1, 2016, a total of 21 cases of Zika virus infection have been reported in Maryland. All were acquired in an area of known transmission outside of the U.S.

The West Nile Virus, a related Flavivirus, was imported (by humans) into the U.S. in 1999, and has since become established even though the vector mosquito (Culex) primarily feeds on birds and is less aggressive compared to the Aedes mosquitos, which are aggressive biters that prefer humans.

Considering the magnitude of international travel in this hemisphere, urban crowding, the presence of the vector mosquito adapted to both urban and suburban environments, the fact that most human infections are asymptomatic and therefore undetected, and entry into the summer mosquito season in the northern hemisphere, it is very probable that the Zika virus will become established in the U.S.

Old-fashioned public health measures regarding control of the vector are needed. This includes the removal of stagnant water sources that are mosquito breeding sites and the selective use of pesticides for both larvae and adults. Individual vigilance and tactics to avoid exposure to and bites by mosquitos are especially important this summer.

Resources:

https://www.cdc.gov/zika/

http://mda.maryland.gov/plants-pests/Pages/Zika.aspx

http://phpa.dhmh.maryland.gov/pages/zika.aspx

http://www.cdc.gov/chikungunya/pdfs/fs_mosquito_bite_prevention_travelers.pdf