Medical Staff Updates

FDA now discourages use of morcellator

by Medical Staff Office on May 1, 2014

By Henry Sobel, MD, Chair, Women’s and Children’s Services

The FDA recently issued an advisory strongly discouraging the use of uterine power morcellators. Read the MedPage article with the advisory and ACOG comment here.  The FDA’s specific recommendation to physicians is highlighted. Leading hospitals around the country are taking either of two approaches: banning use of the morcellator or having its use restricted to within bags in the abdomen to protect against the risk of spread of potentially malignant tissue. This controversy was the subject of our February Women and Children’s M&M Conference.

Since that discussion efforts have been made to assure that we have the necessary high quality surgical bags, and we do. The use of the power morcellator, the incidence of leiomyosarcoma, and the impact of surgical technique on survival are each of some small increment.  Balanced against that risk is the benefit of the decreased morbidity of the minimally invasive techniques allowed by the use of morcellation.  More informed high level conversation is coming from national medical thought leaders, including ACOG.

With that expectation, having seen different responses at other hospitals, and having gotten differing opinions within our service, at this time I see the prudent action to be the more conservative one of requiring the use of collection bags to isolate the tissue from spread within the abdomen at time of morcellation.

Further, the FDA’s discussion points (highlighted in yellow within the attachment) should be considered as imperatives in any pre-operative discussion where morcellation may be a possibility.  And that should be documented.

Due to the small number of patients impacted by this controversy, the potential for stirring up fear and worry and the fact that we are simply responding to published recommendations, I do not view this as something justifying increased local publicity.  It is a subject you should be familiar with, expect questions about and be able to discuss in an informed manner.  If contacted by a reporter, the best response is to refer them to the AAMC PR  department for comment.

Your comments are welcome.  Thank you.

Advertise your practice in AAMC’s Patient Guide

by Medical Staff Office on May 1, 2014

Once again, we would like to introduce an opportunity to inform patients and visitors at Anne Arundel Medical Center about your practice and services. We strive to provide our patients with essential information during their admission, but also want to make them aware of community resources available to them as they prepare for discharge. AAMC is in the process of updating its patient information guide that accomplishes both.

Our guide serves as a resource by providing valuable information (patient rights, billing, HIPAA and discharge information, etc.) to the many patients cared for each year at AAMC and to the thousands of family members, visitors and guests. Every patient who is admitted receives a copy of the guide. Copies are also available in our waiting areas and lounges for family members and other visitors. Additionally, the patient guide is available to view on our website, askAAMC.org, at no additional charge. It is a complete, digital version of our printed patient guide, including your advertisement. When a viewer clicks on your web address they are immediately linked to your website.

The guide includes advertisements for services that may be of interest to our patients, offering a targeted marketing opportunity for you to communicate directly with these individuals. All ads are full color and are available in various sizes. A design team is on hand to help with the ad at no additional charge to you and all advertising will be set up on an annual basis.

Kimp Grant, representative with PatientPoint® Hospital Solutions (formerly Healthy Advice), publisher of our patient information guide, will coordinate this project. We hope that you will join other physicians in this excellent opportunity to market your practice and services.

Advertising will be limited to a first come, first served basis. For additional information, please contact Kimp Grant at 410.733.3753 or email at kimp.grant@patientpoint.com. If you have any questions regarding the distribution of this publication, please feel free to contact Kelly Swan, Communication Strategy Manager, at 443.481.4716.

Summer student clinical research internship

by Medical Staff Office on May 1, 2014

Interested in having a clinical research student intern in your practice this summer? Complete a request here.

Surgeons for Smiles

by Medical Staff Office on May 1, 2014

The year was 1997 when Edward Zebovitz, DDS, first learned about the crucial need for medical and dental care in developing regions of the world such as the Philippines, Caribbean, East Africa, and Bangladesh.

“A colleague of my father’s was doing mission trips, and I knew I had to get involved,” says the oral and maxillofacial surgeon with a practice based in Bowie. The non-profit organization Surgeons for Smiles was born.

Seventeen years later, Dr. Zebovitz and his team of surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, and support staff have completed their 34th mission trip. This time they went to Sorsogon, a province on the island of Luzon in the Philippines where genetic facial deformities like cleft lip and cleft palate are common. The team performed 50 cleft lip and palate surgeries on children in just five days.

“The conditions are horrible,” Dr. Zebovitz says of the places he travels. “People’s basic needs, like shelter and food, aren’t always met. It is very sad to see.” They rely on donations to fund the missions. Whatever is not donated, Dr. Zebovitz personally finances.

This spring, Dr. Zebovitz, who is married to OB-GYN Coryse Brathwaite, MD, and has four children ages 18, 20, 21, and 22, will go on another trip. This time, they will go to East Africa. “I hope to one day retire to Surgeons for Smiles,” says Dr. Zebovitz. Learn more at SurgeonsforSmiles.org.

Obstetric care consensus: safe prevention of the primary Cesarean delivery

by jmiller on April 24, 2014

The rapid increase in cesarean birth rates from 1996 to 2011 without clear evidence of concomitant decreases in materna or neonatal morbidity or mortality raises significant concern that cesarean delivery is overused.  Changing the local culture and attitudes of obstetric care providers regarding the issues involved in cesarean delivery reduction will also be challenging   This article reviews the indications for primary cesarean and how to mange abnormally progressing labor.  (Obstet Gynecol Mar)  Click here to view full-text.

The guidelines battle on starting statins

by jmiller on April 24, 2014

This “Clinical Decision Making”  article explores understanding the cardiovascular diesease risk functions – Aim, development, and evaluation – through a case vignette on whether to begin ..or not begin statis therapy and when to monitor, or not monitor LDL cholesterol.  The article takes the reader through 3 treatment options based on the new guidelines.  (NEJM, April 24)   Click here to read full text.

Safety and feasibility of a diagnostic algorithm combining clinical probability, d-Dimer testing, and ultrasonography for suspected upper extremity deep venous thrombosis

by jmiller on April 24, 2014

Article concludes: The combination of a clinical decision score, D-dimer testing, and ultrasonography can safely and effectively esclude upper extremity deep vein thrombosis.  (Ann Intern Med, April)Click here  to read full-text.

UpToDate Mobile (Free) and NEW INTRANET Remote Access Now Available to AAMC Medical and Hospital Staff

by jmiller on April 10, 2014

UpTodate is now available REMOTELY through the Intranet..and also through FREE mobile app to ALL medical and hospital staff.  Easy access to UpToDate by logging in from any computer with an Internet connection.  Free UpToDate Mobile app for most leading devices.  Free continuing education credits when you research a clinical question using UTD onsite or remotely – including your mobile device.  Questions: call or email Joyce Miller, jmiller@aahs.org, ext 4877.  To read more about how to access remotely and obtain the app, click here. Read the rest of this entry »

Older posts «

» Newer posts